Monday, December 9, 2019
With planning for Congress 2020 well underway, we catch up with Ceri Sherlock, Chair of the Scientific Committee, to find out more about her, the role and what delegates can expect from the programme.

Introducing Ceri Sherlock

Ceri graduated from the RVC in 2004 before joining Bell Equine as an intern. She then completed a surgical residency and Masters at the University of Georgia. She became a Diplomat of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons in 2010.
 
After completion of the residency, Ceri remained in America until 2011 when she returned to the UK for a surgical position at The University of Nottingham.

In 2012, Ceri returned to Bell and has since completed a residency in Diagnostic Imaging in conjunction with the RVC. Ceri became a Diplomat of the European College of Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging in 2015. She currently works as a surgeon and imager at Bell Equine.

Could you explain what your role as Congress Committee Chair entails?

My aims for the role of Congress Chair are to realise the vision that our President Tim has for BEVA Congress 2020 and match this
with feedback from the delegates to try and make this the best BEVA Congress yet. I am working with a team of great people who share the same passion for Congress and we are determined to deliver a memorable programme.


How did you get involved in organising Congress?

I have been on the committee a couple of times previously so have had a ‘taster’ of what is involved. This year, I’m excited to have grasped the proverbial reins and am working, amongst others, with Jonathon Dixon (2019s chair) and Tim Barnett (2021s chair) to continue to improve Congress.

You’ve already started scheduling the programme for BEVA 2020, any sneak peaks you can give us?

We are really pleased to have already got commitments from some fantastic, engaging, knowledgable world renowned, sell out speakers. This year, our speakers go beyond our normal circle of equine veterinary medicine and we are really excited to share this in early 2020.

How does the Congress Committee decide what topics to have lectures on?

We try and incorporate feedback from previous delegates about topics and speakers with new, emerging information to bring up to date, practical relevant information to the delegates. It is also an opportunity for us to ask our colleagues to speak on the questions we have about equine practice.

Your best BEVA?

A tricky question to answer! I can pick a few top moments over the years ranging from (finishing!) my first clinical research abstract in 2005 to being part of the lameness workshop last year. BEVA is always a treat as it is combines a great and varied educational programme with catching up and making new friends in the profession. I can’t remember a BEVA where I haven’t made a new contact that has helped me in some way subsequently.
Could you explain what your role as Congress Committee Chair entails?
My aims for the role of Congress Chair are to realise the vision that our President Tim has for BEVA Congress 2020 and match this
with feedback from the delegates to try and make this the best BEVA Congress yet. I am working with a team of great people who share the same passion for Congress and we are determined to deliver a memorable programme.

How did you get involved in organising Congress?
I have been on the committee a couple of times previously so have had a ‘taster’ of what is involved. This year, I’m excited to have grasped the proverbial reins and am working, amongst others, with Jonathon Dixon (2019s chair) and Tim Barnett (2021s chair) to continue to improve Congress.

You’ve already started scheduling the programme for BEVA 2020, any sneak peaks you can give us?
We are really pleased to have already got commitments from some fantastic, engaging, knowledgable world renowned, sell out speakers. This year, our speakers go beyond our normal circle of equine veterinary medicine and we are really excited to share this in early 2020.


How does the Congress Committee decide what topics to have lectures on?
We try and incorporate feedback from previous delegates about topics and speakers with new, emerging information to bring up to date, practical relevant information to the delegates. It is also an opportunity for us to ask our colleagues to speak on the questions we have about equine practice.

Your best BEVA?
A tricky question to answer! I can pick a few top moments over the years ranging from (finishing!) my first clinical research abstract in 2005 to being part of the lameness workshop last year. BEVA is always a treat as it is combines a great and varied educational programme with catching up and making new friends in the profession. I can’t remember a BEVA where I haven’t made a new contact that has helped me in some way subsequently.


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