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From the monthly archives: November 2009

We are pleased to present below all posts archived in 'November 2009'. If you still can't find what you are looking for, try using the search box.

FEI progressive list

BEVA views the recent announcement by the FEI that they are to adopt a “Progressive List” of medications that are permissible for horses in competitions to be an extremely retrograde step for equine welfare.  This decision obscures the distinction between therapy and subjecting unsound horses to the stresses of competition.  Furthermore, we have grave concerns that horses competing whilst under treatment with pain-relieving medicines, are at an increased risk of musculoskeletal lesions progressing to catastrophic injuries.

We see this announcement as a backward step for the development of equestrian sport that is contrary to the public aspiration of drug-free competition. We would strongly encourage a rational review of the available evidence and if necessary new research to try and formulate a more scientific basis for these regulations.

Henry Tremaine,   BEVA Honorary Information Officer.

 

High autumn prevalence of atypical myopathy across Europe

"High autumn prevalence of atypical myopathy across europe" -We like to alert practitioners that there has been extremely high prevalence of equine atypical myopathy this autumn. During October an unusually high number of cases has been observed in southern England and throughout northern Europe. This condition affects individual and groups of horses at pasture and has a high mortality rate. Young horses in poor to normal bodily condition are particularly prone to the condition and risk factors include cold, damp, frost-free weather and pastures with poor natural drainage and vegetation of low nutritional value. Affected horses have discoloured brown urine and are stiff and weak progressing to recumbency. In its early stages, the condition can be confused with colic or laminitis. Serum activities of creatine kinase and aspartate transaminase and urine myoglobin concentrations are extremely increased. Intensive supportive care is indicated. For more information on preventative measures, and to report suspected ...

High autumn prevalence of atypical myopathy across europe

We like to alert practitioners that there has been extremely high prevalence of equine atypical myopathy this autumn. During October an unusually high number of cases has been observed in southern England and throughout northern Europe. This condition affects individual and groups of horses at pasture and has a high mortality rate. Young horses in poor to normal bodily condition are particularly prone to the condition and risk factors include cold, damp, frost-free weather and pastures with poor natural drainage and vegetation of low nutritional value. Affected horses have discoloured brown urine and are stiff and weak progressing to recumbency. In its early stages, the condition can be confused with colic or laminitis. Serum activities of creatine kinase and aspartate transaminase and urine myoglobin concentrations are extremely increased. Intensive supportive care is indicated. For more information on preventative measures, and to report suspected cases, please go to www.myopathieatypique.be. Dominique Voti ...